“Light is in the air”
In her painting Mayumi Yamakawa combines two entire different techniques – traditional European egg tempera and Japanese Sumi-e (black ink painting). These two century-old techniques create a deep color graduation and peculiar brush strokes, which are most suitable for her prevailing theme – the play of light in the air and the reflections on and over landscapes.

Sumi-e has a wide range of color graduations from pitch black to very light, hardly visible gray, depending on the amount of water added. Water is also useable in egg tempera which creates interesting, delicate color tones, reminding to subtle Japanese colors.

Light in the atmosphere is influenced by a multitude of factors and their combinations – season, day or night time, source, intensity and angle of light as well as type, shape and size of reflecting surfaces, and many more. The range of possible combinations and interdependencies is infinite.

“When looking up and around” Mayumi Yamakawa says, “each time there is something new to discover. This journey into the world of light never ends.”
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Sunset 15
Egg tempera on canvas
30 x 40 x 2 cm
$400.00
   
   
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Mayumi Yamakawa: “Light is in the air”
In her painting Mayumi Yamakawa combines two entire different techniques – traditional European egg tempera and Japanese Sumi-e (black ink painting). These two century-old techniques create a deep color graduation and peculiar brush strokes, which are most suitable for her prevailing theme – the play of light in the air and the reflections on and over landscapes.

Sumi-e has a wide range of color graduations from pitch black to very light, hardly visible gray, depending on the amount of water added. Water is also useable in egg tempera which creates interesting, delicate color tones, reminding to subtle Japanese colors.

Light in the atmosphere is influenced by a multitude of factors and their combinations – season, day or night time, source, intensity and angle of light as well as type, shape and size of reflecting surfaces, and many more. The range of possible combinations and interdependencies is infinite.

“When looking up and around” Mayumi Yamakawa says, “each time there is something new to discover. This journey into the world of light never ends.”
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